Saturday, December 15, 2007

Winter Roses, 8x10

This is a painting I did from imagination. I thought it might be fun for people to see what that process involves. When I'm looking at other artists' work, I often think the "in progress" pictures are more informative than the finished piece. A note of caution-I would never teach anyone to work this way; it is just something I do for fun. You have to have decent drawing skills to pull it off. The start is really nothing more than a Rorschach test; I make some random marks and "see what I see." I usually turn the canvas 90 degrees, step back, and see if something comes to me. If it doesn't, I keep turning the canvas and making a few marks until something emerges. In the first picture, I can see a vase of flowers with a landscape in the background, so I'll commit to that.































At this point I'm adding a paint similar to yellow ochre to the black paint already on the canvas, resulting in a neutral dark green color. I'm trying to keep the background fairly loose and undefined, so it won't compete with the flowers.
































I've laid in a grey color in the foreground to imply a window sill or ledge,and defined the vase and flower masses. I'm still winging it and guessing at this point.






























I decided I needed some snow in the field outside. I thought it would help to bring out the flowers more,since this is a fairly dark painting. Also, this is the point where I need a reference! I had an old painting of some geraniums on an overcast day so I looked at that so see what the vase might look like. Also, I had to look at some of my rose photos to see how the petals are shaped.































Here's the finished painting; its just a matter of refining things at the end.

16 comments:

rob ijbema said...

very interesting Leslie,
how you get to the final image
really like the muted colors,
creating the mood,

Chris said...

Well, maybe you don't *recommend* working that way, but it looks like a lot of fun!

Dani Brandimarte said...

Thanks for sharing your process. I paint from my imagination sometimes too and the problem I have is that when "I see what I see" it's always the same subject, usually a woman. I never see landscapes or objects. You seem to have a nice variety of things in your head to draw from!

Leslie Sealey said...

Thanks Rob!

David Bogart said...

never painted from my imagination.
i like this one leslie, sort has a "mob hit" feel to it....dark and elegant at the same time.

Leslie Sealey said...

Hi Chris, it is fun, I admit it. : )
It's really more playing/daydreaming than anything.

Leslie Sealey said...

That's interesting, Dani. I notice that my imaginary ones tend to be "dark" in terms of mood.

Leslie Sealey said...

David, only someone from NJ would describe a painting as having a "mob hit" feel. Ha ha ha!
uh....don't hurt me! ;- )

David Bogart said...

yes i probably have watched one too many episodes of sopranos.

what i meant was the painting kind of has a gloomy feel to it. when i think of "dark" and roses i automatically think of a black rose...which is never a good thing to receive.....at least up here anyway. :)

Leslie Sealey said...

I was just giving you a hard time, I am so glad the mood comes across here. I was thinking of a dark winter day, at twilight.

René PleinAir. said...

Great way to work Leslie!

I do wonder while making these kinds of work, your starting to notice a little bit of yourself again in it? I mean its still you who sees things in the so called Rorschach test, and it's still you that's paint. don't you have the feeling that you are painting a mirror this way?

A mirror called "Leslie Sealey"

Leslie Sealey said...

I think you are right, René. : )

A Reason to Paint said...

I really like this Leslie, the darkness adds a level of suspense that really appeals to me.

Leslie Sealey said...

Thanks! I was really happy with the way it turned out.

Sorrentino said...

quite lovely and different, I really love the mood and texture of the piece and the media handling!! :)

Leslie Sealey said...

Thank you, Sorrentino! I am amazed at the response this particular painting has received.